sleep

  1. runawaybunny

    Outdoor light linked with teens' sleep and mental health

    Large-scale study of US teens shows associations between outdoor, artificial light at night and health outcomes Research shows that adolescents who live in areas that have high levels of artificial light at night tend to get less sleep and are more likely to have a mood disorder relative to...
  2. runawaybunny

    Is your child getting enough sleep?

    Children who get the least sleep have the greatest risk of developing mental health issues. There are plenty of good reasons to make sure children get enough sleep, but their parents' evening peace is nowhere near the most important one. "If we make sure our children get enough sleep, it can...
  3. runawaybunny

    Bad sleep habits can depress teens

    Links to negative thoughts and perfectism Nagging negative thoughts - and striving for perfection - keep teenagers awake at night, raising their chance of becoming depressed and anxious, a new study shows. An online study of almost 400 adolescents aged 14 to 20 years confirmed the link...
  4. runawaybunny

    Children's mental health is effected by sleep duration

    Depression, anxiety, impulsive behaviour and poor cognitive performance in children is effected by the amount of sleep they have researchers from the University of Warwick have found. Sleep states are active processes that support reorganisation of brain circuitry. This makes sleep especially...
  5. runawaybunny

    Exercise may help teens sleep longer, more efficiently

    Getting more exercise than normal - or being more sedentary than usual - for one day may be enough to affect sleep later that night, according to a new study led by Penn State. In a one-week micro-longitudinal study, the researchers found that when teenagers got more physical activity than they...
  6. runawaybunny

    More sleep may help teens with ADHD focus and organize

    Study is first to find executive functioning skills deteriorate with lack of sleep Teenagers with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may benefit from more sleep to help them focus, plan and control their emotions. The findings--the first of their kind in young people with...
  7. runawaybunny

    Split and continuous sleep in teens impact cognition and glucose levels differently

    Many adolescent students sleep less than the recommended duration of 8-10 hours a night. It is unclear; however, whether short night sleep combined with an afternoon nap is as good as having the same amount of sleep continuously during the night without a nap. Researchers at Duke-NUS Medical...
  8. runawaybunny

    Research shows teens too low on sleep, activity, and too high on screen time

    Only 1 in 20 U.S. adolescents is meeting national recommendations for sleeping, physical activity, and screen time, according to new research by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). The study, published in JAMA Pediatrics, also revealed differences in the...
  9. runawaybunny

    Poor grades tied to class times that don't match our biological clocks

    Schedules of night owls, morning larks and daytime finches may predict their educational outcomes. It may be time to tailor students' class schedules to their natural biological rhythms, according to a new study from UC Berkeley and Northeastern Illinois University. Researchers tracked the...
  10. runawaybunny

    Lack of sleep could cause mood disorders in teens

    Chronic sleep deprivation--which can involve staying up late, and waking up early for work or school--has become a way of life for both kids and adults, especially with the increasing use of phones and tablets late into the night. But this social jet lag poses some serious health and mental...
  11. runawaybunny

    Is ADHD really a sleep problem?

    Around 75% of children and adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) also have sleep problems, but until now these have been thought to be separate issues. Now a in a pulling together of the latest research, Scientists are proposing of a new theory which says that much of ADHD...
  12. runawaybunny

    How to stay sane when your child can't sleep

    Your child's sleep problems may be making you depressed and unsure of your parenting skills, says a new paper by UBC sleep expert and nursing professor Wendy Hall. The good news is you can turn the situation around. In this Q&A, she talks about the connection between parental sanity and infant...
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