Another rage attack

Discussion in 'General Parenting' started by Xheni, Jan 22, 2020.

  1. Xheni

    Xheni New Member

    My younger son had another rage attack yesterday. The last one he had was in September. When I got home from work I prepared food for him. He got into a rage why I was being late with the food. He began to curse and kick me. He almost broke the laptop. I slapped him hard several times. He became even more raged and wanted to get out. I was afraid that he would curse loudly in the neighbourhood so I didn't let him out, instead restrained his hands and body. He thrashed violently to get released but I didn't let him go. This went on for almost two hours. My arms ache from all the force I had to exert to keep him restrained. He told me that I want to kill him, that I had a hammer in my hand (which was not true), that I was putting him on fire (it was the warmth of my body). It was as if he became psychotic. His muscles would get rigid periodically, similarly to when he was a baby and would have crying spells during his sleep. When he seemed to calm down I let him go. He later returned and went to sleep. At 2 oclock in the morning he woke up and began to cry and curse me again.
    Now I have had some doubts that he reacts with anger to infections and sensitive foods. One of the sensitive foods I am suspicious of is egg white. I myself react with anger several hours after consuming it. It causes my muscles to tighten up, brings insomnia and irritability, which last for several days. He used to eat eggs or foods with eggs every day, but not in the last weeks. For some time he consumed almost only crepes, which have egg white. Or at times he would eat two eggs daily and than stop abruptly. I do this kind of behavior (eat a lot of something and then stop) with mood altering foods. He was very peaceful during the last weeks when he didn't consume eggs. But yesterday my mother told me that he ate 2 eggs. I thought "Let's see if he has an angry outburst". Lo an behold, it came.
    He is also consuming a lot of meat products with glutamate. Daily. I am reading that monosodium glutamate is excitatory. On the other hand, egg white causes a release of histamine and there is something called "mast cell rage" (mast cells release histamine).
    So my plan now is to stop the eggs, the glutamate and to give him magnesium and vitamin C. But he hates me now and does not want to cooperate.
    From my personal experience with mood altering foods, I often return back to consuming them, even get addicted to them, as if my body wants to be inflamed and sabotages efforts to be healthy. I am afraid that this will also will happen to my son
    As for what to do when the rage happens again, I plan to not slap him at all (it was a mistake by my part), and ask him to take magnesium, or vitamin C, or any medicine the doctor will advise. I don't want to give him psychiatric medications, at least not yet.
     
  2. BusynMember

    BusynMember Well-Known Member

    I have to run for work this morning, but am thinking of meth. How old is your son and does he dabble in any drugs? Do not discount this possibility, a likely cause.

    My daughter tampered with meth. It made her violent and nuts.
    in my opinion that is more likely than allergies. And you are not a doctor. You can't treat an allergy by internet info or books. If that is even it. A doctor handle his diet if you suspect this but that is not the first place I personally would go.

    Another possibility is severe mental illness either mixed with drugs or not. Yes, pot can cause psychosis in people with latent mental illness. Like alcohol, some can NOT safely smoke pot. It is not benign. I understand not liking psychiatric medications, but they are better than untreated mental illness. Often untreated it gets worse. I still think it sounds like drugs

    If your son let's you explore with him, I would drug test him first then look at mental illness. I don't know where you live and am aware that in certain countries it can take a while to get an appointment with a psychiatrist, but if his drug test (or a few) are completely clear, pot included, I would put him on a list for a psychiatric evaluation no matter how long that takes. Meth in particular however can cause psychosis and rage and it's not pretty.

    You can always explore allergies if your son is clean and sober and the psychiatrist says he is not mentally ill, but I'd go to the other two options first. Drug tests can be bought all over. Don't tell him you are doing one in advance.

    My heart bleeds for you and for everyone who has troubled adult children. It is the hardest thing. My daughter can not live with us.

    Prayers to you and love and healing light. It is dangerous to physically fight a grown adult. I would not do it. I would call the police first.

    Hugs.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2020
  3. Xheni

    Xheni New Member

    He is 9 years old and has had the rage attacks since 2 years old. Before that he has had attacks similar to rage but which happened during sleep. Now I am not much interested in a diagnosis but rather in knowing the triggers and how I can help when the attacks happen.
    Thanks a lot for the support. I can't imagine what will happen 10 years from nows.
     
  4. JayPee

    JayPee Sending good vibes...

    Oh my gosh, I'm sorry for all you're going through.

    With all due respect, knowing the diagnosis WILL help you to some degree in handling the problem. Just treating the symptoms does not get to the root of his issues. Perhaps, with a full psychological evaluation and some behavior testing would be a good place to start and some possible medications or plans to get him on the right path. He likely doesn't like feeling like this either but doesn't understand it all.

    I liken this to some who have addictions. Yes, there's a need to stop drinking, over-eating etc. but until the mental and emotional reasoning why someone does what they do is reconciled, they often continue suffering with their addictions.

    I will pray for you and hope that the right people are put in your path to help you find the answers you need for your sons well-being and your family.