Anyone have an older teen/young adult who was diagnosis'd with ODD as a child?

TiredSoul

Warrior Mom since 2007
My son was diagnosis'd with ADHD and ODD in Kindergarten. He still has these characteristics at age 17.

What has helped your child? Are they still like this? Did they outgrow it? How is their life now?

Oppositional Defiant Disorder

⚠Angry and irritable mood:

✓Often and easily loses temper
✓Is frequently touchy and easily annoyed by others
✓Is often angry and resentful

⚠Argumentative and defiant behavior:

✓Often argues with adults or people in authority
✓Often actively defies or refuses to comply with adults' requests or rules
✓Often deliberately annoys or upsets people
✓Often blames others for his or her mistakes or misbehavior

⚠Vindictiveness:

✓Is often spiteful or vindictive
✓Has shown spiteful or vindictive behavior at least twice in the past six months

Your child isn't likely to see his or her behavior as a problem. Instead, he or she will probably complain about unreasonable demands or blame others for problems.
 

HMBgal

Well-Known Member
Grandson was diagnosed with ADHD, definitely had many characteristics of ODD, but not the spiteful, vindictiveness stuff. He always had a lot of embarrassment, shame, and guilt when he would lose it at school and hurt someone. He was always very empathetic to others, kind to animals and children. He has high anxiety still, and was diagnosed with DMDD. He's 13 and half now and many of these behaviors have gone away or reduced to the problem of not being much of a problem. He's a teenager, so there's that.

He's in a wonderful school for kids with behavioral challenges and he's learning so many coping strategies from the therapists there, and he's like a different kid. We also took him off all the medications he was on. His doctors kept changing medications and dosages and we couldn't tell what was going on. We had the genetic testing done and it showed that traditional ADHD medications weren't likely to work as expected. He hasn't been on any medications for over a year, no melt downs at all at home, and once in a great while at school, but it's often because of a peer and it's always handled appropriately and the staff makes sure that it's a learning experience. There are consequences and he's learning to take responsibility for his actions.

It's been rough, but the progress has been amazing and we are so grateful. If he had stayed at a regular school, I'm not sure where we would be right now. He's in a program that the school district placed him in. It's a three year program before they get transitioned out (with a lot of support). I don't think he'll have to be there the whole three years. If the student hasn't had an unsafe or melt-down event in six months, they start transitioning them back to their regular school, which will be high school, in his case. Personally, I wish they could keep him there through college!
 
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