Reopening the U.S. - What does everyone think...

RN0441

100% better than I was but not at 100% yet
I am in Alabama and our stay at home order ends on Thursday evening.

I have no word yet on when I can return to the office but it could be Monday.

I do think that people will be more respectful of social distancing after this. It may wane after time but when we are out at the store, walking in our neighborhood, etc., I do see it. I think if we roll out slowly and are cautious this could work HERE where we live. We are not in a highly populated, highly affected area. Husband and I have been following all rules. We have not even been with anyone other than the three of us that live in our home. Son does work as he is an essential worker.

I think teenagers and younger people will not be as cautious because that's the age and mindset.

We are all responsible for our own safety. If you are high risk stay home and stay away from others until this passes.
 

JayPee

Sending good vibes...
I think that the consequences of everyone's actions will provide the balance in the long run. If people start pooling in restaurants, shopping malls etc., without caution, we will be forced back into a stand still position again. In my opinion it has to be done by dipping our toe in the water and slowly re-opening but there are many angry, frustrated people who feel their rights have been taken away from them.

I also think that learning from watching other countries and states re-open will help us map our way through this.
 

Deni D

Well-Known Member
I'm in north New Jersey, but north west New Jersey, which seems to be a different world from the hot spot part of north New Jersey. We have been left out of the equation here, because it's been deemed we are not as bad off as the eastern counties in the state, but only because the eastern part has been overwhelmed, not because it's all rosy here. We just got testing here a couple of weeks ago after we made the news for a horrible revelation about a nursing home in our county. Before that we were begging for help from the state representatives up this way, with no response. Until then this area, which has a large number of people who work in NYC and a large number of essential workers and nursing home residents who have been sick, not just the nursing home that made national news (too many who have died) have been mostly ignored. Not because of our numbers (mostly uncounted) but because our numbers are not being counted. If people can breath at all they have not been tested, told the hospital is not someplace they want to be and then sent home. Hopefully they are being tracked to see if they are still alive in their rural homes.
All who I have spoken to here are planing to continue to self isolate and pray for our heath care, grocery store, delivery, police and such and hope the idiots who can't stand to be home for a couple more weeks don't come out to our lake and parks and pass it on more. In this area we know the people who are stuck sticking their necks out are still getting sick and have too minimal protection and testing. When I hear the essential workers here have access to the Rutgers fast testing and proper PPE then I'll feel more comfortable about going out myself.
 

BusynMember

Well-Known Member
I have many siblings. One lives near you so I know how bad it is. You are being smart to keep isolating. To me, money means nothing if you are dead. Many workplaces where I live have become infected. These are also essential services and not all were in hospitals. Grocery stores and meat packing plants too. People are scared to go back to work. If some people want to risk their lives and that of others, I can't stop them. But I won't join them.

Prayers and love.
 

RN0441

100% better than I was but not at 100% yet
Our governor is speaking at 11am today. I am sure her big concern is our beaches. I am on the coast and imagine if they reopen, others will flock here. I do know in Florida the beaches are very restricted. If we do that here that would probably keep out of state visitors away. I don't expect many restrictions to be lifted today.

I do feel so sorry for the small businesses here and I do hope they can open with restrictions so they can stay afloat. Our community will support them. We certainly will. Husband and I are very blessed as we are working from home with full pay but my heart goes out to those that are suffering right now and I feel so much for them and their hopelessness.
 

Copabanana

Well-Known Member
I do think that people will be more respectful of social distancing after this.
I was reading today about Sweden, where they took a far different tack than did the USA, the rest of Europe and other places. They made social distancing voluntary. They did not close businesses such as restaurants, bars, etc.; nor did they close schools or beaches or any other thing. What they did only was restrict gatherings of 50 or more people.

And despite this lack of mandatory restriction there seems to have been no greater prevalence of the disease, for example, no greater rate of infection than Ireland that pretty much closed down.

The Swedes seem to base their success in limiting the infection rate to their trust of one another to voluntary protect each other. An elderly woman of 83 was quoted in the article that she trusted the young people to protect her, as she walked into a government office for an ID.

It is this I think that we lack as a culture, at least where I live. The sense of common fate. The desire to act in ways that protect all. Not just me.

I do not feel like people as a whole are concerned about my welfare when I leave home. I do feel that people that know me are. But even people in my neighborhood, I don't think they're concerned. I don't think they wish me ill. But I don't necessary have trust that they care. I guess that speaks more about me then them. I will work on it.
 
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BusynMember

Well-Known Member
Sweden is very small. I think NYC is bigger. It is also a likeminded society, in general.

This has not even worked out state to state in the U.S.

Our nice suburban town, spread out, isn't too bad, but even with restrictions some people are not following them. Our biggest cities are terrible. Makes me cry.

In the U.S. not everyone is going to behave safely.

I fortunately don't know people who died, but have many friends who do. I think it is going to be different for us. We already lead the world in deaths. I too feel bad for small businesses who are struggling. Our own business is struggling. But I am more concerned about life and health. I am not going to live in fear but I am going to be cautious. I can have fun without packing into a movie theatre, restaurant or crowded store. I have my family and friends and plenty of hobbies and things to do that don't include crowded places. We have a boat. I love our boat.

Our lives have changed forever.

Maybe if I was younger I would feel differently, but it is what it is. One day at a time.
 
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RN0441

100% better than I was but not at 100% yet
Our beaches open Friday. Husband and I will go on Saturday but our son works.

I'm looking forward to my toes in the sand and being SIX feet away from others. Not much closer than I'd normally be to a stranger anyway really!
 

RN0441

100% better than I was but not at 100% yet
I was reading today about Sweden, where they took a far different tack than did the USA, the rest of Europe and other places. They made social distancing voluntary. They did not close businesses such as restaurants, bars, etc.; nor did they close schools or beaches or any other thing. What they did only was restrict gatherings of 50 or more people.

And despite this lack of mandatory restriction there seems to have been no greater prevalence of the disease, for example, no greater rate of infection than Ireland that pretty much closed down.

The Swedes seem to base their success in limiting the infection rate to their trust of one another to voluntary protect each other. An elderly woman of 83 was quoted in the article that she trusted the young people to protect her, as she walked into a government office for an ID.

It is this I think that we lack as a culture, at least where I live. The sense of common fate. The desire to act in ways that protect all. Not just me.
I do not feel like people as a whole are concerned about my welfare when I leave home. I do feel that people that know me are. But even people in my neighborhood, I don't think they're concerned. I don't think they wish me ill. But I don't necessary have trust that they care. I guess that speaks more about me then them. I will work on it.
My company is owned by the Swedes and I did see that story! Incidentally, they think they are much smarter than the Americans!!! LOL
 

MissLulu

Active Member
I just want to comment on this because here in Australia we locked down early and it was not voluntary. Our population, although much smaller than the US, is larger than Sweden. We have had a much lower rate of infection than Sweden. In fact, our rate of infection is one of the lowest in the world. We are starting to very slowly ease restrictions now, but we know that it is going to be a very gradual process.

I’m so worried about all my friends overseas, especially in the US. Staying home has been difficult for us and it has had economic consequences. I feel for people who are out of work and can understand why people want things to go back to normal, but until there there is a vaccine I can’t see how things can go back to the way the were before the virus. I think our nation and our neighbour, New Zealand, have proved that lock down and social distancing really work. We have had less than 7000 cases nationally and despite very widespread testing, new cases each day are now in single digits. Stay home if you can!
 

Copabanana

Well-Known Member
I feel for people who are out of work and can understand why people want things to go back to normal, but until there there is a vaccine I can’t see how things can go back to the way the were before the virus.
These are my sentiments, exactly.

I don't understand at all the response of the United States Government to this Pandemic. I am unsure if it's indifference to what happens to people, as in "let them eat cake/die" but let the stock market prosper and rise, while we blame EVERYBODY else, or whether they are impaired to the point that they are engaged in magical thinking, instead of leadership, or all of the above. And I don't understand why the medical doctors who are responsible to the public seem to be going along. We need testing. We need contact tracing. We need reality and concrete, factual communication about the real situation we face together.
 

BusynMember

Well-Known Member
I agree too. Americans are very spoiled. Some want to go out so to them we have no problem or it's inflated. I have heard ugly things about how old people will die anyway and we need money. I don't care for it.

Good for your country. You are doing the right thing.
 

Copabanana

Well-Known Member
I have heard ugly things about how old people will die anyway and we need money.
Well. This has a kind of logic to it. As in: Let them go first. After all, they will die anyway. Everybody will die anyway. Why point the figure at me? Look in the mirror. You go first.

Gosh. Babies are dying. Tots are dying. 5 years old. 7 years old.

What is wrong with these people?

I worry so very, very much about the people who have lost work. And where do they find new jobs? Where do they live? What do they eat?

I am worried about so much right now. People are not sheep. Will there be social upheaval? Rioting? I am not advocating revolution here, but people need to believe that their government is responding to their true situations, not only manipulating them, lying to them, sacrificing them. What will all of us be facing if this turns ugly? My heart breaks for all of us.

I fear this will turn worse before it gets better. I hope I am wrong.
 
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KTMom91

Well-Known Member
The unrest has already started; people are scared and blaming one another for their difficulties. And the Facebook rants! I have a FB acquaintance that is practically rabid at the governor's mere existence, and then others who hold him up in praise. We're all feeling our way in the dark, and some are behaving in a more gracious manner than others.

I hope you are wrong, too, but sadly I think you are right. It will be worse, and then the second wave of illness will hit. More finger pointing, more yelling, more anger, more fear, and more people suffering and dying.
 

Deni D

Well-Known Member
The unrest has already started; people are scared and blaming one another for their difficulties.
That's happening around here too. I see it online mostly. I fear for those who will loose their jobs and small businesses permanently, and those who have fallen through the cracks for unemployment benefits. Also those who even though are getting a lot in unemployment right now feel really shaky with their normal bills and their future.
But not so much for the people, at least around here, who are ticked off about their "liberties" being taken away but really mean they can't have parties, tie their boats up together on the lake, go to bars and such. In my area we don't have people stuck in high rise apartments who can't get out into the fresh air. Most have their yards, and if not can drive locally to walk around and such.
The way I work with my worry is by trying to figure out what I can do. I donate to the local homeless shelters and the town food bank we now have increased greatly here. But it doesn't feel like I'm actually doing anything.
I worry the most about what's going to happen once we open up more again. So I'm taking the online course for "contact tracing" right now my state is looking for, for volunteers. We finally have a drive through testing site as of yesterday in my county so if we get the testing media, PPE and personnel to test I can add something if they choose to pick me to volunteer for them.
No matter what anyone says about the number of people affected, percentage of people affected, asymptomatic people, I know first hand that people die from it. Not that they were going to die any day anyway but that it shortened their lives by years even with co-morbid conditions. I mean really, does someone die in days from a heart condition, or from being elderly, or from diabetes? It's a fact that even our local hospitals went on divert due to overloaded ER's and ICU's, even with their increase in capacity. We are not in a large city. I know that only a month ago around here people who have been very sick, and were not tested, were told they have it and not to go near the hospital unless they couldn't breath at all.
I believe we are better prepared in general but not nearly enough prepared in my opinion. I don't think my state has the ability to get enough testing and the support around testing that would be needed to be prepared to identify and isolate as we need right now.
I hope I'm wrong.
 

Copabanana

Well-Known Member
the governor's mere existence
I think our governor has done a fabulous job and does not deserve the vitriol cast at him. How many of us has he kept alive by his courageous and astute choices? I trust him.
In my area we don't have people stuck in high rise apartments who can't get out into the fresh air. Most have their yards, and if not can drive locally to walk around and such.
I live in an area like this. If I keep my head down, and focus on what I can do, which is walk, water my fruit trees, do housework, and my online activities, I am okay.
I'm taking the online course for "contact tracing" right now my state is looking for, for volunteers.
This is fabulous Deni. I may look into doing this too.

I just enrolled!
 

RN0441

100% better than I was but not at 100% yet
I ventured out for a pedicure and eyebrow wax yesterday.

Appointments only
Wait outside until they tell you to come in
Everyone must wear a mask
They disinfect stations between each use
They took my temperature
I had to wash my hands the minute I entered
Only 10 people (5 employees and 5 customers) at a time

They put up Plexiglas at the nail stations

I was very impressed with the way they handled everything. They were very professional.

I am getting my hair colored tomorrow. I'm sure that will be an experience too.
 

Copabanana

Well-Known Member
They put up Plexiglas at the nail stations

I was very impressed with the way they handled everything.
That was my sense yesterday at Costco. I hope they take the plexiglass down when we're through this, and don't make us live in bubbles for the rest of our lives. I like to be with people. I seek it.

I'm more impressed with some of these stores, than I am with the medical establishments, doctors and labs. What I liked with a couple of doctors is that they're leaving the doors wide open. Here we can do that at this time of year. Other than that the doctors are leaving it to their patients to self-monitor.
 

HMBgal

Well-Known Member
I'm in California, in a neighboring county that has had very high numbers, and where Patient Zero got her nails done (they think--the Vietnamese-American community is very upset with Governor Newsom for pointing that out). I live in a small beach town between Santa Cruz and San Francisco. It's been quiet here except on the weekends, when we are flooded with tourists that don't in any way observe the rules. They are coming from high risk areas into our low risk areas, no masks--it's like they are on vacation from their lockdown. We've closed the beaches so they park up in our neighborhoods, leave their trash, etc. There are signs all over saying if you're five miles away from home, turn around. Ignored, completely ignored.

We are very good about face masks in my county. You can't get into a store without one. You have to stand in line to get in, there are one-way markers on the floor; you have to wait for a cashier to call on you to come off your six foot mark. My grandson's summer school, a requirement, will be done with distance learning, which he is fine with, thankfully. He was supposed to graduate into high school. Because there's no hoopla, he's not really registering that he'll be a freshman. We are locked down really tight with no end in sight.

Thank heavens for screens for the kids, FaceTime, etc. They have been amazing. Both of their schools have done a really good job with distance learning and the kids are doing well with it. And since both my husband are retired, we aren't in the very sad situation of having lost our income. Husband worked for United Airlines for 40 years and was furloughed many times, but at least he could find work elsewhere to tide us over. Even that option is not possible now. I feel like we're on our own to make our own way forward. I have to be super careful because Husband is 77 years old and has rheumatoid arthritis and is on very strong immunosuppressant drugs. I need him to be around to help me finish raising my two grandkids! (and I rather like sharing my life with him).

So, I'm waiting for some kind of restrictions to be lifted so I can go see my daughter who lives in a suburb of Seattle. She's a teacher and has two little ones at home and a husband who is locked up tight in his home office all day working. So she has to do her teaching job work, take care of the kids (3 and 6, one boy who has ADHD) and be their teacher, too. She needs my help desperately but I'm afraid to drive up there just now with so many services being limited. I just imagine being stranded out on the highway somewhere with the other two grandkids. Sigh. Life is different now.
 
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